I-5 Shooting Between Woodburn and Brooks Today Sends 1 to Hospital; Witnesses Asked to Contact OSP.

Press release from OSP today:

Oregon State Police is currently investigating a shooting incident that occurred on Interstate 5 near Brooks.

This event occurred at approximately 11:50 A.M. southbound on Interstate 5 between Woodburn and Brooks.

OSP is asking anyone with any information or that might have a witnessed a road rage type incident between a Black Honda Accord and another vehicle to call Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or *OSP.

One person was transported to the hospital with injuries.

St. Paul Asks Residents To Conserve Water Due To “Dangerously Low” Well Water Levels.

St. Paul City water customers are being asked to conserve water due to “dangerously low” water levels in the City wells. The message was posted on the City’s website today. Customers with questions can call the City’s Certified Operator, Ben Unger, at (971) 261-7339, according to the post.

North Fork Road Closed Due To Forest Fire.

Marion County Sheriff’s Office received information from the US Forest Service of a fire in the Opal Creek Wilderness area near Beachie Creek. The fire is burning approximately 10 acres. North Fork Road (FR2209) is closed at the forest boundary, including Three Pools and Opal Creek trail, all of FR2207 from North Fork to French Creek Road is closed. At this time the US Forest Service and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office Search and Rescue are working together to facilitate evacuations of the aforementioned areas. These areas remain closed until further notice.

Thinking About Fireworks? Read This Good Advice From The Oregon State Fire Marshal.

Legal fireworks go on sale in Oregon this year beginning June 23rd, and the Oregon State Fire Marshal has answers to commonly asked questions.   (It may help you avoid a $2,500 fine for illegal fireworks possession or use, too.)

What type of fireworks can I use in Oregon?
Retail: A permit from our office is not required to use Oregon consumer legal fireworks, also sometimes referred to as retail fireworks. Commonly known Oregon consumer legal fireworks are fountains, flitter sparklers, and ground spinners just to name a few.
Limited: 1.4g products, also known as consumer fireworks in the fireworks industry, may be used in Oregon only with a valid permit issued by our office. Common 1.4g fireworks are bottle rockets, Roman candles, firecrackers, and certain aerial fireworks. For more information on the permitting process, visit our website at https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Fireworks.aspx.

Where can I purchase Oregon consumer legal fireworks, also called retail fireworks?
They can be purchased at an Oregon permitted retail fireworks sales location during the retail fireworks sale dates of June 23 through July 6. For approved locations, visit our website at https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Fireworks-Retail-Permits.aspx.

When can I use Oregon consumer legal fireworks, also called retail fireworks?
Under Oregon law, the Office of State Fire Marshal has no regulations on when you can use retail fireworks purchased during the retail fireworks sale dates of June 23 through July 6; however, you need to check with local government for any local regulations.

Where can I use Oregon consumer legal fireworks, also called retail fireworks?
You can use Oregon consumer legal fireworks, also called retail fireworks where fireworks, are not prohibited.
Some prohibited locations are Oregon State beaches, parks, campgrounds, and State and Federal forest lands. You may also want to check for any local regulations. For more information visit their websites.
Oregon State Parks: https://oregonstateparks.org
Oregon Department of Forestry: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/index.aspx
Bureau of Land Management: https://www.blm.gov/oregon-washington
U.S. Forest Service: https://www.fs.fed.us

Can I bring fireworks to Oregon from another state?
No, fireworks must be purchased from an Oregon permitted retail fireworks sales location.

Can I use fireworks that fly in the air?
Fireworks that fly in the air, explode or behave in an uncontrolled and unpredictable manner are not allowed to be used in Oregon without the proper permit issued by our office. A limited fireworks display permit would allow you to use 1.4g fireworks, commonly known as bottle rockets, Roman candles, firecrackers, and certain aerial fireworks. For more information on the permitting process, visit our website at https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Fireworks.aspx.

Can I use sky lanterns in Oregon?
No, the law prohibits the use of sky lanterns in Oregon at all times.

Can I use fireworks at a private event?
Retail: You can use Oregon consumer legal fireworks, also called retail fireworks where fireworks, are not prohibited.
Some prohibited locations are Oregon State beaches, parks, campgrounds, and State and Federal forest lands. You may also want to check for any local regulations. For more information visit their websites.
Oregon State Parks: https://oregonstateparks.org
Oregon Department of Forestry: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/Pages/index.aspx
Bureau of Land Management: https://www.blm.gov/oregon-washington
U.S. Forest Service: https://www.fs.fed.us
Limited: Yes, you can, if you have completed the permitting process for a limited display permit allowing you to have a fireworks display using 1.4g also known as consumer fireworks in the fireworks industry. Common 1.4g fireworks are bottle rockets, Roman candles, firecrackers, and certain aerial fireworks. For more information on the permitting process, visit our website at, https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Fireworks.aspx.​

Firew​orks and the Impacts of COVID-19 in Oregon
Are legal fireworks going to be for sale in Oregon during the sale period (June 23-July 6) this summer? 
OSFM has been receiving and processing applications for retail sales of consumer fireworks, therefore we anticipate residents will see Oregon consumer legal fireworks for sale this year.
Will the state’s rules and other measures implemented by local governments prevent organized fireworks displays?
Check with your local jurisdiction for updates on organized fireworks displays. Gov. Brown’s plan for reopening Oregon bans large gatherings such as conventions, festivals, and major concerts and live audience sporting events through September.
Can a local jurisdiction ban the sale and/or use of legal fireworks? 
There could be local restrictions in place. Always check with your local city, county, and other local authorities jurisdictions before using any fireworks.
Why are the sale and use of legal fireworks being allowed as the state addresses COVID-19?
Gov. Kate Brown’s Executive Order​ to stay home and save lives does not specifically ban the sale and use of legal fireworks in Oregon due to COVID-19. Oregon law provides for the regulation of fireworks at the local community level since that is where they are sold and used. Check with your local authorities if any restrictions are in place before buying or using fireworks.
Conseq​uences
 

What can happen if I get caught using fireworks in prohibited areas?
Under Oregon law, officials may seize fireworks and you maybe charge with a class B misdemeanor, which could result in a fine of up to $2,500 per violation and a civil penalty up to $500.

Can I be held liable for damage and costs incurred in suppressing fires caused by use of fireworks, by myself or my child?
Yes, those who misuse fireworks or allow fireworks to cause damage may be held liable and required to pay fire suppression costs or other damage. For more information, visit our website at https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Fireworks.aspx.
https://www.oregon.gov/osp/Docs/ParentBookEnglish.pdf

How can I report illegal fireworks usage?
Do Not Call 911 unless it’s an Emergency!
You can report illegal usage of fireworks by calling the non-emergency dispatch telephone number of your local law enforcement agency. Under Oregon law they are authorized to enforce the fireworks laws in Oregon.
Oregon Fireworks laws and rules: https://www.oregon.gov/osp/programs/sfm/Pages/Fireworks.aspx#one

Commentary: “Contact Tracers” Will Be Fanning Out In Counties Authorized To Re-Open. BIG Brother Is Alive And Well In The Age Of Coronavirus.

Re-opening under Governor Brown’s plan has tradeoffs, including the deployment of a small army of Orwellian “contact tracers” who will gather information about you.

Consider that once collected, the information will likely be subject to retention for a number of years under Oregon Public Records Laws.

How this information might be used, stored, or available beyond the prevention of disease is yet to be fully answered, and Civil libertarians and the Courts are sure to become involved. 

https://www.wweek.com/news/2020/05/20/reopening-oregon-depends-on-a-detective-squad-tracing-where-contagious-people-have-been/